Twitter data available in CSV and JSON with a nice HTML view

Eight months after I requested my own Twitter data from Twitter through a legal request under the European privacy law, Twitter now allows you to download your own tweets through their interface. The archive can be downloaded from the settings page (see this blog post from Twitter) and the file named tweets.zip contains all your tweets from the beginning. The tweets are stored in two different formats: CSV and JSON which makes it a versatile archive to work with for both users and developers. The archive does not only contain your own tweets but also tweets you have retweeted but excludes DMs and favorites. The archive is neatly organized and tweets are stored in files per year per month, for example: 2007_08.js. The .zip file also includes an interface to browse through your archive per year per month: My previous archive which I received from Twitter contains more data because back then I requested all data Twitter keeps about me, which includes direct messages, metadata and logins, IP addresses, contacts, etc. The data that is available per tweet in both archives is quite similar: When comparing my old archive to the new archive what seems to be different however is the availability […]

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International M.A. in New Media ­at the University of Amsterdam: Call for Applications for­ Fall 2013

International M.A. in New Media ­at the University of Amsterdam Call for Applications for­ Fall 2013, rolling admissions open on 1 November 2012 and close on 1 April 2013 One-year and two-year New Media M.A. Programs available. For the two-year “Research Master’s Program: New Media Track,” see below. New Media M.A. – One-year Program The International M.A. in New Media & Digital Culture (NMMA) at the University of Amsterdam (UvA) is accepting applications for 2013-2014 academic year. Applications open on 1 November 2012 and close on 1 April 2013. The NMMA is a one-year residence program undertaken in English at the UvA in the heart of Amsterdam. Students become actively engaged in critical Internet culture, with an emphasis on new media theory and aesthetics, including theoretical materialist traditions, practical information visualization trends and web data using digital methods. The overall focus of the MA is on training the students as new media researchers. Our permanent faculty are recognized experts in their fields, who are committed to their students. The program admits approximately fifty students per year, classes are no larger than 20, and the faculty-to-student ratio is 1:5. Curriculum 1st Semester: students follow a course in new media research practices and […]

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Meme images as personalized action formats and user-generated tactics

At the first Issue Mapping workshop at Goldsmiths (see workshop report), University of London in May 2012 we focussed within our visual tactics group on the fairly recent phenomenon of adjusted photos and how do they deal with the concepts of issues and action formats. There are several things you can do to an issue: Personification (turn it into a person, for example a celebrity). Montage images or text (mashing the issue up, recomposing it into different formats). Recomposing a text, a spooftext, using the elements. Sloganification. Root it in geographical space (to attribute it somewhere) or to groups of people. The camp is the prototypical way to do it. Issuefication and memeification In our group we focused on a specific type of formatting an issue, what we initially called the montage image. These adjusted photos are often formatted in the very recognizable visual style of the meme-image with captions on top of and below the image. Think, for example, of the Pepper Spray Cop or Kony 2012. While sometimes referred to as ‘photoshop memes’ (KnowYourMeme) they do not even require an expensive graphic design suite such as Adobe Photoshop as they can be easily created online with so-called meme-generators. While […]

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The imagery of Project X Haren

On the 4th of October I participated in a hackathon with Project X Haren data organized by Tweetonderzoek (University of Utrecht) and SETUP Utrecht. After organizer Thomas Boeschoten welcomed us and talked us through the program I adressed some ethical concerns about working with this data. The ethics of working with big data The Project X Haren event has led to riots and injuries amongst youth, citizens of the city of Haren and the riot police and to millions in damages and is therefore loaded with a guilt question. Who’s to blame and who is going to pay for the damages? Facebook’s default settings, a few ‘instigators’ encouraging people to go to the party,  the social media platforms for spreading the message, the media for turning it into a media event, the youth that showed up in Haren? A commission (commissie-Cohen) has currently been formed to look into that complicated question. I raised several questions, also related to boyd & Crawford’s “Critical Questions for Big Data” where they raise several ethical questions such as what is the status of so-called ‘public’ data on social media sites? […] Should someone be included as a part of a large aggregate of data? What if someone’s ‘public’ blog post is taken […]

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Visualizing bipartite Facebook Like networks

My colleague Bernhard Rieder added a new feature to his netvizz application which now allows you to create a network graph of your friends and their Likes. Instead of a network visualization that shows the connections between your friends, this bipartite graph includes two different Facebook objects in one graph: your friends and their Likes and the connections between them. My graph contains 308 users (all anonymized in the images), 21240 different liked objects and 31189 likes (click to enlarge images). To reduce the map to a readable format I’ve eliminated users who like less than three objects and objects that have been liked by less than three people. As expected we can find clusters around television shows, bands, albums, musea, technology blogs but also more local things such as venues in Amsterdam. An interesting similarity with my Austrian colleague his network is political satire. His graph shows Kann dieser seelenlose Ziegelstein mehr Freunde haben als H.C. Strache? (Can this soulless brick have more friends than HC Strache?) as one of the most liked objects and within my Dutch network Kan deze baby uil meer fans krijgen dan Geert Wilders? (Can this baby owl have more friends than Geert Wilders?) and LINKSE HOBBIES (Left-Wing Hobbies) […]

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Photos from underground: Building Amsterdam’s new subway line.

My work, the University of Amsterdam Mediastudies Department, is located next to the Rokin. The Rokin has been under construction for many years now, in order to build Amsterdam’s new subway line that connects Amsterdam North to Amsterdam South.The project is taking longer than expected, costs millions more than expected which may have led to the media campaign the city of Amsterdam has been running for a few years to engage its citizens with the project. Of course they are running a social media strategy with a YouTube account, a Facebook page and a Twitter account where they show the progress and answer questions but my favorite way to increase engagement is that you can actually visit the worksite underground! Only 50 metres from my work you can walk down two flights of stairs and enter the a secured area that looks over the worksite. Once you’re down there you start to realize how enormous the entire undertaking is of drilling a shaft that is kilometres long and that actually runs underneath a lake, since the Ij is technically not a river! I can recommend everyone to visit the Uitkijkcentrum Rokin.

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