Tag: sandberg


Follow the Money: Koert van Mensvoort on “Money as a Medium”

Money is one of the oldest virtual realities in our society/culture and points to the deep penetration of the virtual in our society. Reality and authority is underestimated as we are moving from a world of things to a world of info. In 2006 Ailin Graef became the first virtual real estate millionaire in Second Life with virtual Linden Dollars. In 2009 China put ‘New Limits on Virtual Currency‘ when the virtual economy became so big that China decided to regulate it. Virtual money is actually a pleonasm as money has always been virtual (except for livestock, physical cattle as currency). Over time currency became smaller and smaller and eventually turned round into coin currency. A big pile of coins led to the invention of bills and from 100 BC the banknote as a form of currrency was accepted. In 1973 the Gold Standard was abandoned which implied that money is now worth X because we tell you it is worth it. While coins that “In God we trust” it actually means “In the government we trust.” The Currency Fountain by Koert van Mensvoort et al is an installation that translates the virtuality of money into something physical again: water. […]

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Stifo@Sandberg presentations in De Balie

Introduction by Martijn de Waal The Stifo@Sandberg workshop used to have a revolutionary edge to it which has now gone because the media have established their legitimacy. As media have matured, the workshop no longer focuses on the revolutionary media type but on the media specific grammar. The workshop now zooms in on a specific medium and tries to understand, expose and use it’s language. How can we use a particular medium to achieve a certain goal? Lotte Meijer & Erin Moore – Tuesday Tuesday is an interactive tour made for the Museum of Modern Art New York (MoMA). Lotte describes how the museum oozes a form of complete perfection which transforms the museum into a non-place. Yoshio Taniguchi, the MoMA architect responsible for the redesign of the museum said the following when presenting his redesign: This disappearing of the museum transformed it into a non-personal sterile place and Meijer and Moore wanted to bring back the stories and turn it into a personal space. Lotte Meijer collected stories about the museum from it’s employees, ranging from educational guides, to cleaners and nightwatchers during her one year internship. Visitors can connect to the MoMA wireless network with their iPhone and […]

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Arjo Klamer @ New Cultural Networks Conference

Arjo Klamer addresses the question of “how can we bridge the gap between economics and culture?” Klamer gave up on PowerPoint a long time ago because the flip-over has several advantages over Powerpoint: You can keep referring to it and you can draw and add notes while you are speaking to clarify things. This makes it a superior technique that is very effective. Presenters often read off the PowerPoint which not only makes it a very boring presentation but it also makes people feel stupid because they can read themselves. Klamer gives us a live demonstration of the advantages of another “old forgotten” presentation technique: the overhead projector. This old presentation technique immediately causes some problems because the right sheets and pens are initially lost. Arjo Klamer is professor of the Economics of Art and Culture at Erasmus University in Rotterdam, The Netherlands, and holds the world’s only chair in the field of cultural economics (from klamer.nl). This chair has changed dramatically over the years as there used to be an enormous gap between economics and culture. Economics was a suspicious subject especially when you were critical of government subsidies. Nowadays more and more people in the world of the […]

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Mieke Gerritzen @ New Cultural Networks Conference

Mieke Gerritzen, head of the Design department at the Sandberg Institute, opened the New Cultural Networks conference organized by Stifo@Sandberg. She addressed the general idea of networking online where we constantly have to fill in our profiles. The irony is that when I applied for this conference I received a confirmation e-mail which included the request for my postal address. I kindly asked why they wanted to have my postal address and they answered “so that we can send you a printed invitation next year if you would like.” It is interesting that an institution that organizes a conference that addresses the topic of new cultural networks wants to include me in their old postal network. I declined the offer of printed invitations in the future and replied that I will keep myself up-to-date using one of the many new cultural networks such as upcoming.org or the nettime mailinglist. Gerritzen stated that creating a profile feels like creating a homepage. This idea is based on the somewhat dated idea of the homepage as the place to build your online identity. I think this idea is no longer maintainable because the homepage was a central place that you had control over. […]

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