Slides from my presentation on Web Archives and Digital Methods

These are the slides from my presentation on Web Archives and Digital Methods: Reconstructing the Dutch Blogosphere with the Internet Archive. During the NWO CATCHmeeting “Supporting Media Studies Research: Exploration and Contextualization” at the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision in Hilversum I presented some web archive use scenarios with a specific focus on doing digital methods research with the Internet Archive. Abstract: Historically, the practice of web archiving has involved various institutions and the development of various practices, approaches and tools. Among them, three main approaches to web archiving have been developed: web archive research using the Internet Archive and Wayback Machine, the practice of archiving special collections of websites, and the national approach of archiving webs of specific countries. These approaches and practices do not only reflect the time in which they were conceived in the history of web archiving, but also put forward distinct ways in which they may be used and consequently what type of historiographical research can be done with them. However, there are also limits to what these tools and practices offer. The purpose of this talk is to introduce the limits of doing research with the Internet Archive with existing tools such as […]

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Trackers gebruikt op de websites van Nederlandse politieke partijen in kaart gebracht

Naar aanleiding van een artikel van Marjolein Kampschreur over de nieuwe cookiewet in Nederland en de implementatie van cookies door Nederlandse politieke partijen op hun websites besloot ik met behulp van onze Track the Trackers tool het gebruik van trackers als beacons, cookies, plugins, widgets en analytics op de websites van Nederlandse politieke partijen kaart te brengen. Download hier de kaart in hoge resolutie als PDF. De VVD komt naar boven als de partij met de meeste trackers. Google Analytics en de Twitter Badge zijn de meest gebruikte trackers op de websites van de politieke partijen. English summary: Trackers on Dutch political websites. Methodologie 1. Corpus Alle landelijke politieke partijen in Nederland die zijn vermeld onder de kopjes ‘Nationaal vertegenwoordigd,’ ‘Lokaal vertegenwoordigd’ en ‘Actieve partijen.’ Websites van partijen waarvan het domein te koop staat of het domein niet resolved zijn verwijderd uit de lijst. De volgende websites zijn getest op trackers: http://www.vvd.nl http://www.pvda.nl http://www.partijvoordevrijheid.nl http://www.cda.nl http://www.sp.nl http://www.d66.nl http://www.groenlinks.nl http://www.christenunie.nl http://www.sgp.nl http://www.partijvoordedieren.nl http://www.osf.nl/ http://www.50pluspartij.nl/ http://www.gbpheerde.nl/ http://www.degroenen.nl/ http://www.fnp.nl/ http://www.nederlandtransparant.nl/ http://www.ncpn.nl/ http://www.trotsopnederland.com/ http://www.vcp.nu/ http://www.verenigdeseniorenpartij.nl/ http://www.stemdirect.nl/ http://www.democratischeuropa.nl/ http://www.islamdemocraten.nl/ http://www.libdem.nl/ http://www.nederlandkiestlokaal.nl/ http://www.libertarischepartij.nl/ http://www.lijst17.nl/ http://nederlandsemoslimpartij.nl/ http://www.nvu.info/ http://www.psp92.nl/ http://www.pvdt.nl/ http://www.partijvoormensenspirit.nl/ https://www.piratenpartij.nl/ http://www.republikeinen.org/ http://www.politiekcorrect.nl/ http://sopn.net/ 2. Trackers vinden Onze Track de Trackers tool, die gebaseerd is op Ghostery, […]

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Featured on “First Five”

I was honored when I was asked to contribute to the First Five Tumblr which asks “What are the first five websites you visit every day?.” In August 2007 I described my daily blogging routine on this blog by consciously looking at which websites I visit daily and why. In 2007 my morning routine was as follows: I opened Thunderbird for my email and then Firefox as my browser to visit my startpage Netvibes which I used for my feeds, then I would look at my blog’s statistics through a WordPress plugin, and then I would look at the MyBlogLog sidebar widget to find out more about my blog visitors and I would end with a confrontation with my latest blog post which would immediately prompt me to write a new one. I’m very excited to revisit and reflect on my daily routine five years later by providing my First/Top 5. The first thing that strikes me is that my routine has changed significantly because I usually check my phone first (Twitter, Instagram and email) before turning on my laptop. I submitted the following five (ok, I secretly submitted six) websites: 1. Twitter https://twitter.com/ Twitter is one of my favorites and […]

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An easy solution to remove your contacts from Twitter

Two days ago I wrote a post on ‘What does Twitter know about me? My .zip file with 50Mb of data‘ where I showed that Twitter is currently storing 152 phonenumbers and 1186 e-mail addresses from my contacts which have been imported when I used the Find Friends feature. However, it seems fairly simple to remove this data from Twitter (although it would require another request to be 100% sure that all contacts have been deleted) using the following instructions which have been provided by the Twitter Help Center: To remove contact info from Twitter after importing: You can remove imported contact info from Twitter at any time. (Note: Your Who to follow recommendations may not be as relavant after removing this info.) Click on Find Friends on the Discover page. Under the email provider list is a block of text. In that text there is a link to remove your contacts (highlighted below). Click remove, and you will be prompted to confirm that you’d like to remove your contacts.

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What does Twitter know about me? My .zip file with 50Mb of data

Three weeks ago I read a tweet from @web_martin who had requested all his data from Twitter under European law and received a .zip file with his data from Twitter. He linked to the Privacy International blog which has written down step by step how to request your own data. On March 27, 2012 I initiated my request following the instructions from the Privacy International blog, which included sending a fax (fortunately I work at the Mediastudies department) to Twitter with a copy of a photo ID (I blanked out all personal info, I just kept my picture and name visible) to verify my request. Within a day, after verification of my identity, I received an email reply with instructions to get my own basic data. These instructions were basically API calls which provide very limited data. While the above did not provide me with any new information I did appreciate the quick response from Twitter to point out how to get publicly accessible data through the API. However, I was more interested in the data that they keep but do not allow me to directly access, that is, without a legal request. Well within the 40-day timeframe, three weeks […]

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