WordPress and photos 3: Configuring Flickr for your blog

In my previous post I explained why I said goodbye to Zenphoto and Gallery and started explaining why I said hello to Flickr. Flickr offers a free account that has a (bandwidth) uploading limit of 100 Mb a month and a Pro account for 24.95 USD that offers unlimited uploading. I started out with a free account and uploaded some pictures. One of the blogging options from Flickr is the “Blog This” button that sends a picture to your blog once you have configured your blog settings: Step 1: define your blog software Step 2: define your API Endpoint (this is the location of your xmlrpc.php file on your server) and supply your WordPress username and password. Step 3: verify and confirm your details As you can see Flickr uses the MetaWeblog API service to communicate with your WordPress. MetaWeblog API (MWA) is a standard client-server application programming interface for weblog (blog) publishing. It is built on XML-RPC.1 Flickr uses the MetaWeblog API to communicate WordPress using the XML-RPC protocol. The XML-RPC protocol is a very important protocol in blog software as it is also the basis for RSS, ping, trackback and Weblog Clients for offline blogging. Before we are […]

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WordPress and photos 2: Goodbye to Gallery2 and ZenPhoto

My website, before I turned it into a blog, consisted mainly of a small portfolio. I hardly ever updated my portfolio except that I added a few pictures now and then in the photography section. Even though I was technically capable of designing and coding a minor addition or update could sometimes mean major work. This is one of the reasons I switched to the WordPress blog software; to facilitate easy additions. What WordPress doesn’t facilitate however is the easy uploading and managing of (multiple) files, see my post “Uploading and file management in WordPress.” Because of the serveral reasons mentioned in my previous post I tried a few standalone galleries that handle the uploading and managing of photos much better. I tried two galleries that are both written in PHP (just like WordPress) and offer plugins to integrate with WordPress. First I tried Gallery2 with the WPG2 plugin for WordPress but this resulted in some problems. On top of that I couldn’t get the Gallery to integrate in the look of my WordPress theme and after fiddling with the files for hours I simply gave up. I moved to the nice looking minimalistic Zenphoto with the ZenPress plugin for […]

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WordPress and photos 1: Uploading and file management in WordPress

I have been wanting to bring my photo gallery back online but I really have been struggling with it. WordPress’ uploading system doesn’t facilitate easy and quick uploading of multiple files or folders. You can upload one file at a time through the interface which will be uploaded to the uploads folder in the content folder on your webserver. The file is stored in a subfolder with the name of the current month in a folder with the name of the current year. For example: wp-content/uploads/2007/04/filename.jpg Uploaded files are managed by date instead of name or content further underlining the chronological descending order built into blogs (and blog software). In the interface you can only upload files when you are writing a post and after uploading the file is linked with this post. If you upload several files, one by one as multiple file uploading is not possible, you can browse through them using the “Browse” tab. If you want to use the file again for a different post you have to browse through all your uploaded files under the “Browse all” tab. The files are sorted in chronological descending order and not by post or filetype making it hard […]

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The Whatever Button – Now for Firefox!

Michael Stevenson and Erik Borra developed the Whatever Button for Firefox which makes your life so much easier: Pay Submit Send Whatever At almost every turn on the Web, we are asked to say yes. Yes to registration, yes to membership, yes to personal recommendations. Yes is said for us, with pre-filled checkboxes that read ‘Keep me informed’. Or there might only be a semblance of choice – for example, saying no to browser cookies makes navigating the Web nearly impossible. More generally, however, it is a matter of clicking through the various forms in order to get what we want and to get to it faster. A matter of saying, ‘Whatever’. And when that happens, we might wonder to what extent ‘Yes’ is our own default setting rather than that of the machine. The aim with the Whatever Button, then, is to pause and ask why we give away personal information so easily. The add-on makes the exchanges honest, re-labeling the buttons we press – whether they say ’search’, ’send’ or ‘okay’ – with the more accurate description, ‘Whatever’. The Button is for fun, of course, but should highlight rather than hide the significance of our various Whatever moments. […]

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Review: Infotopia. How Many Minds Produce Knowledge – Cass R. Sunstein

Oxford University Press, New York, NY, USA 2006 288 pp. Hardcover, $16.50 USD ISBN 0-19-518928-0 Buy at Amazon Infotopia deals with the main question of how many minds produce knowledge. Sunstein has a legal background and takes on a mechanistic approach to political theory. One way to produce knowledge is through deliberation Habermas-style but it has four flaws: Amplification of group errors Information is not elicited Cascading effects Group polarization Sunstein sees prediction markets Hayek-style as a way to overcome these flaws. His unified theory does not leave much room for hybrid forms. However, not all issues are suitable for prediction markets nor for deliberation so what would be really interesting is to study hybrid forms. Knowledge production that takes the best of deliberation and prediction markets. While the book has some flaws such as loose end definitions, a unified approach and a lack of critique on aesthetics it is a very interesting read. The book made me question democracy, polling systems, the Amazon recommendation system, Digg, the blogosphere and tons of other things. In the conclusion Sunstein translates the systems he describes into deliberative recommendations which might make him a deliberative democratic after all. What interested me most in […]

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Second Open-Search Workshop

For your info: What: Second Open-Search Workshop When: Saturday April 28, 2007, 13.00h CET, 11.00h GMT, 06.00h EST, 4.00h EET, 01.00h HST, 04.00h MSTDuration: official program will be 4 hours Where (physical): CREA, room 204, Turfdraagsterpad 17, 1012 XT Amsterdam (route: http://www.crea.uva.nl/contact/zoomplattegrond.html) Where (virtual): http://www.open-search.net/Opensearch/SecondWorkshop Cost: free attendance, free drinks More info: http://www.open-search.net/Opensearch/SecondWorkshop If you can hold a keyboard, you should be at this workshop! The open-search project proposes to build a distributed, peer-to-peer, search-engine. By combining the already existing technologies ofpeer-to-peer file storage, distributed crawling and peer-to-peer searching, we hope to solve the problems inherent to a centralized search-engine: manipulation, censorship and profiling. After a period of contemplation and reflection, the open-search project is ready for some serious hacking and discussion. If you have any programming skills, analytic skills, interface design skills or other skills that you can use to contribute to the open search project, we have todo list items with your name on them! Those concerned with the legal and policy details of the project are also welcome for the non-technical track, to discuss policies, legal issues, issues of deployment and ideology versus users. Virtual attendance will be possible through on-site A/V streaming and internet relay chat […]

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